In Defense of Slut-O-Ween

29thOct. × ’09

slutoween2

Annabelle River recently wrote a blog post, defending my favorite holiday, Dress-Like-A-Whore-Day– or Halloween. And I am right there with her. Hating on the spray-tanned “slutty” Disney Princesses, Playboy Bunnies and naughty nurses has become Internet feminist protocol, and I’m yawning.

Halloween is the one holiday that celebrates naughtiness, it has become the one night where sex– that act that remains repressed and stigmatized in our culture– becomes celebratory, or even just normal! Women in “naughty” costumes — at least to me — seem to be allowing themselves to live out their fantasies for one night.

Many of the Internet Feminist blogs, like Jezebel, Feministing, so on have already written tired anti-slutty costume posts, and a common thread seems to be that they just find these costumes “unoriginal.”  Because you actually see so many truly original costumes on Halloween? Un-slutty vampires, witches and fairy costumes are just as pervasive and cliched. This excuse doesn’t hold up, so why are we so afraid of/angered by sexy costumes?

I only did the slutty Halloween outfit once. My roommate and I were going to a house party. From my closet, I pulled together a last minute costume to match a libidinous-mood. A pink deep v-neck tank with a pink lacy bra popping out  and a tu-tu pulled high enough for my boy-short undies to show. I was a slutty-ballerina, obviously.

I lost count at how many people I’d kissed after number ten, and this was what I had set out to do. My slutty costume and the half moons of the butt-cheeks it revealed gave me the confidence to turn my Halloween into fulfilling sexual desires. I worked the party with an air of confidence that I have never been able to duplicate. Maybe that is why the “slut” is so scary– she gets what she wants.

But the argument that hits strikes with fear on Halloween is not about college girls wearing cat-ears, but the protest that children’s costumes are becoming too revealing. Annabelle handles this well, saying:

“The politically correct concern for Halloween costumes is to protect our impressionable daughters from the dangers of sexuality. And yes, of course, children should be strongly protected from sexual coercion of any kind. But I think the concerned conservatives and the concerned feminists both underestimate how early puberty naturally sparks lust. I started masturbating and writing long obsessive diary-entries about “cute boys” when I was eleven.”

Wouldn’t part of a sex positive society be accepting that adolescents are in fact sexual beings? Wouldn’t it be about allowing them a safe venue for exploring their new-found sexuality? If an adolescent girl wanted to wear a more “adult” looking costume, like the short-skirted ragdoll costume that Annabelle dug up, I think this could be a safe way for her to explore her sexuality — which of course does not mean having sex.

For this situation to work the parent would need to trust their child and vice versa. Ideally, if you have raised your child to be a smart, self-aware, self-loving individual then you should know that you can trust them to make the right decision.

A teacher I had for a gender studies course once remarked at how with each feminist movement, plenty of non-feminists celebrated their new rights, often with a risque display of their sexuality. Flappers were an offshoot from suffragettes and the the mini-skirted sixties came with the second wave.

Perhaps the women who feel free to wear what looks like sex role-play costumes on any other day are the by-product of feminism.  While they may go back to sexual repression after a skimpy walk of shame, I am still howling at the moon because sexuality is unabashedly on full display for one night.

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2 Comments

  1. Lisa J
    Posted 2009-10-30 at 12:23 | Permalink

    Thanks for this post!!

  2. Posted 2009-10-30 at 12:44 | Permalink

    So glad you enjoyed, Lisa! Your insights were part of the inspiration for this post!

6 Trackbacks

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